Friday, September 6, 2013

Sepia Saturday 193, 2013 September 7: Far and Away with A Man and Odara




This prompt showed a girl in a rowing boat in the middle of nowhere. It struck a cord.  Not Sepia , or even old photographs, but the thought of Far And Away kept ringing in my head.  I knew the pictures and the story.   Several years ago the Man was given a vision, build a boat for Far and Away.  And this is the journey.







The Man paddling his Odara in the  Bowron Lakes, north of Prince George, British Columbia is Far and Away from home, work, automobiles, stores, theaters, television, and noise.








She - Odara - dinna always glide through the water like a sleek water nymph.  In the beginning, she was just a vision.  Thin strips of wood, sewn together with fine wire, until the Man began to see her lines take shape.  A fragile vision she was in those early days as the Man carefully and precisely added strip by strip.







Strip by strip, holes drilled, wire sewn and tied, until the hull was formed.  Then hours of quiet sanding - more than one way to be far and away - until Odara was ready for that first coat of epoxy.  Her bones would settle and be firm. 







Sleek, she looks now with her hull shimmering with its final coat of epoxy  - yet still fragile for the trip in the Man's mind.













Now the deck takes form and is balanced  atop the hull, bewhiskered with tiny thin wires.













She is starting to look almost regal, gleaming with epoxy, hull line marked.












Fibre glass laid over the deck, waiting for the wetting of resin.












Glassed deck and hull.  Still lots of work, but hard now for the Man to contain his excitement and dream of Far and Away - but Odara is still in two separate pieces - deck and hull.











She doesn't look so pretty now.  Bound together with straps, ropes and tiedowns, but she is becoming the whole Odara as the deck and hull are glued fast.










Yes!  Deck fits to hull, and Odara is nearly sea worthy.












The cockpit flanges and the seats are built and checked for fit  --- and, of course, the Man sands and buffs and sands.












Odara's three cockpit design demanded that every clamp in the Man's collection be used to  attach the cockpit flanges.  Looks like she was being attacked by a swarm of boat eating snapping eels.












It was worth it.  The triple cockpits look great, once the clamps were dispersed.










The seats are in, hardware attached, and the Man has put the final touches of paint on Odara. After over a year of the man being far and away in his shop with dreams of he and Odara being Far and Away, now is the time for Odara to be a boat.









Man presented Odara, a triple cockpit Osprey kayak, to the world on her maiden voyage on a small lake near the shop where dreams were made.








  



A family outing on the river.  A shakedown cruise before heading to the Far and Away.








To the Man, any day in his shop or on the water with Odara can be far and away.  Together they have plied the San Juans, watched whales (way to close), traveled the 70-mile Bowron Lakes circuit, and shared the water of the lakes and rivers with family and friends.  Any day on the water is Far and Away.


~ ~ 

 © Joan G. Hill, Roots'n'Leaves Publications



Paddle now onto see where other Sepians   have gone. 


36 comments:

  1. Fascinating! I had no idea how they were made.

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  2. Interesting pictures showing how the boat was built. Sure rides low in the water, though. I think I'd be a little nervous.

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    1. Yeah, t'was a little low in the water. He said he should have shifted load that day and put the gear in the front hatch. Then put daughter who wasn't feeling well -- and is just a whiffet -- in the middle hatch.

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  3. Oh how special. Great to be able to see and hear about the boat under construction. What a wonderful feeling it must be to float in a boat that one has made with one's own hands. I loved the "way too close" addendum regarding whales. When we went whale watching in a much bigger boat I was surprised how quiet everyone was on the boat when we came upon the whales. I think everyone was in awe. Just incredible.

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    1. He does have a connection with Odara. And yes, they too thought the whales were just awesome.

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  4. Boat building, especially the bit on the three cockpits, fascinates me and reminds me of Must Love Dogs and Onassis.

    Hazel

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    1. It was an interesting process. I felt priviedged that he kept a log of photos which he shared. Made it seem like we too were part of the building Odara -- at least in spirit.

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  5. Is the Man related to you? What a beautiful boat he has made.

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  6. Oh, Joan! Fabulous post -- absolutely loved watching the creation of this lovely, lovely kayak -- she's a beauty!

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    1. Deb, glad you liked the post. I thought the creation of Odara was an interesting story -- or process -- depending upon how you look at it.

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  7. I like the way you documented the whole process.

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    1. Thank you. However, me thinks the Man would have had some editorial remarks -- he's very precise in how he calls things.

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  8. I really, really, really liked this piece! It's so alive with feeling...something I have always felt your writing lacked. What did Russ think? I bet he really liked it.

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    1. glad you liked it. I think Russ liked it as well -- although he had a couple of corrections to my verbiage and description. Guess that's what happens when a non-boat builder describes the process. I do think Odara is quite lovely.

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  9. How interesting to see the whole process from the beginning. Your words add so much to the pictures.

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    1. Thank you. glad that you enjoyed seeing Odara come to life. She is a beautiful craft.

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  10. What a lot of effort to document all those stages. The whole project must have been very important to the Man.

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    1. I think he loved every minute --- well, there were a few problems that he probably could have done without. I think he enjoyed sharing the pictures of the process both to show how Odara was "becoming", but also because it was important to him.

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  11. Great post, Joan with the story of a boat so well told. I didn't know there was such a thing as a three seater kayak.

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    1. Bob, periodically, he comes upon other kayakers who have built their boats -- some three cockpit kayaks. He says they always stop and talk to one another about building their boats, places they have kayaked, etc. A small but spiritually close community.

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  12. A very interesting post. Reading all these posts makes me realize what an close relationship some people have with water and how they use it.

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    1. Right, the water is a connection that is almost unexplainable --- unless you too feel it. Great observation.

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  13. Joan. I enjoyed very much reading about the construction of the kayak and seeing the pictures of it all coming together. Your very first picture took me back many years when I visited Seattle and British Columbia for one summer as a child. I went on a camp with the scouts to a lake where we canoed and we also made trips to sounds and islands
    and various national parks with friends. It is a beautiful part of the world.

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    1. Wow, Anne, Seattle and BC are a far piece from Australia. It is lovely country with gorgeous lakes and mountains. Glad you enjoyed reading about Odara and the Man's journey.

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  14. It was pretty exciting watching the boat slowly built and waiting to see it in the water. Must have been amazing in real life.

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    1. Kristin, it was indeed an amazing feat to watch. Glad you liked our little part of the journey and voyage.

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  15. Wonderful to see the creation of this craft. It's beautiful.

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  16. A labor of love, and a fascinating story.
    Liking the end results.
    :)~
    HUGZ

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    1. One of the things that I dinna mention was the fact that he had never built a boat before. He saw the picture in a boat catalog, and said, " I want that boat" and then he ordered the kit (which contained strips of wood & directions of a sort). Now I think he would just purchase the wood and go from there -- with the end result much the same.

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  17. I enjoyed your post about the making of a kayak so very much! Thank you for sharing!

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    1. A bit different from your sailing in the Netherlands, but the feeling of being on the water is probably much the same. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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  18. I love how you told this story.

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    1. Thanks, Wendy. Part of me thinks this would have been a good article for a magazine or newspaper, but SS lures some good stories out of the woodwork.

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  19. A boat made with loving care. Somehow it made me think of the classic children's picture book "Paddle to the Sea", which as a child I loved to read over and over. I wonder what great journeys this little kayak will undertake in its lifetime?

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  20. Wow! And I thought my father was amazing repairing a boat! Odara is beautiful -- a work of love!

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    1. She is indeed beautiful --- especially in my son's eyes.

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