Saturday, June 29, 2013

Sepia Saturday, 183rd; 2013 June 29th, Lava Beds National Monument

The Lava Beds National Monument still intrigues me and seems to fit in with this 183 Sepia prompt.  As teenagers a trip to the Lava Beds was a special treat, as it was years later for my children and even later still, for my grandchildren. Lava Beds National Monument, located near Tule Lake, California, is about 30 miles from where I grew up.  It's a land of turmoil, both geological and historical. Over the last half-million years, volcanic eruptions  have created a rugged landscape dotted with diverse volcanic features. More than 700 caves, Native American rock art sites, historic battlefields and campsites, and a high desert wilderness.  The following pictures are from the website of the Tule Lake Lava Beds National Monument.  The following picture is of a collapsed cave trench.   I was never one to be grubbing around underground, but my husband and son were  always thrilled with their caving expeditions.   When he was but a teenager, my husband (to be) and some of his buddies found a pair of moccasins and an old canoe paddle stashed on a ledge of one of the  caves.  If I remember correctly, when they went back to show the county's local expert on the Modoc Indians, the stash was gone -- or they couldn't find the right turn in the right cave.

One of the most beautiful caves, at least in my opinion, is the Blue Grotto cave.  The colors are magnificent ---and one doesn't have to go too far underground to see it's beauty.
The Blue Grotto
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument

Entrance to the Blue Grotto
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument
The following picture shows the entrance to one of the many tube caves, which were formed by streams of lava flowing underground.  I was never fond of going in these caves as it almost always called for crawling along on one's belly --- in the dark.
Entrance to A Large Tube Cave
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument
One of the most lovely of the caves, or so I have been told (it's way to far underground for my comfort) is the Ice Cave as shown by the following two pictures.
Ice Formations in the Ice Cave
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument

Tricky Roping Across the Floor of the Ice Cave
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument
To me, one of the most fascinating parts of the Lava Beds is the Petrogylphs, as shown in the following three pictures.  There are over 5,000 pictograms and drawings on these cliffs.  The information given at the Ranger Station indicates that the drawings were many times done from a canoe or boat of some sort.  Now the Petroglyphs stand like sentinels to an earlier time.


One of the More Than  5,000 Drawings on the Cliffs
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument
Petroglyph Point
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument

Symbol Bridge
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument
Another Fascinating Petrogylph
Courtesy of the Lava Beds National Monument

This brings to a close my (non)-Sepia offering, but the does seem to be a connection to the theme. For other Sepian offerings, click here.(Note:  On another day, when Sepia appropriate, I'll warm to  the history lesson of the Lava Beds and Captain Jack's Stronghold.)

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 © Joan G. Hill, Roots'n'Leaves Publications

17 comments:

  1. I wonder who made those petroglyphs and what they meant by them.

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  2. Wonderful! Caves and petroglyphs - perfect combo. I enjoyed learning about cave drawings in Sedona, Arizona, but I have no pictures of them in caves.

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    1. Thanks, Wendy. Glad you enjoyed the pics of one of my favorite places -- even tho the caves are a tad scary to me.\

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  3. Great...yet another location to bring me back to California one day !

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    1. And I dinna know that you had California connections. Hi, neighbor -- well, sorta.

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  4. It is thought that the Petroglyphs are thousands of years old ---and the Lava Beds area was homeland to the Modoc Indians (and their ancestors) for at least a thousand years. When I look at the drawing, and realized that Petroglyph Point was at one time and island, I am just mesmerized.

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  5. I think the petroglyphs would be the most interesting feature for me too.

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  6. Can't wait for the Captain Jack story!

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  7. Pity I didn't know about them when we visited California.

    Yes the petroglyphs are very interesting.

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  8. We share a volcanic bubble connection!

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  9. When I heard the name "Lava Beds" I just thought of hardened lava spread over the ground. I was surprised that there is so much more there, even an ice cave.

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  10. What a wonderful place. This week's Sepia Challenge is certainly proving that there are almost as many amazing sights under the ground as there are on the surface.

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  11. The Lava Beds look fascinating & beautiful. Gosh, my husband used to go duck hunting over in Tule Lake & at night the gang would relax in the hot springs there. That last photograph with the petroglyphs written over the imprint of a fish is interesting. I wonder if the fish actually is an ancient imprint in the rock? Probably is. Lava flows have created some very unique forms in California. Here in Tuolumne County we have Table Mountain - a long winding flat mountain created 9 million years ago when a huge volcanic eruption sent lava flowing into the original Stanislaus River displacing the water & hardening. Over time the softer earth around the hardened lava wore away leaving the ancient riverbed high & dry.

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  12. As a Californian I'm ashamed that I've never been to this wonderful site. What a thrill it must have been for your husband as a teenager to stumble on those artifacts. I really enjoyed these photos.

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  13. For some reason you've suddenly reminded me of some caves I visited in Austria. People were sent through in small groups with the lead person holding a lamp. Then all the groups would stop at a certain spot while the guide would explain what we were looking at in German. I don't speak German. I was traveling with two friends, one who had studied German at UC Berkeley. We had been grouped with two English fellows who also didn't speak German. We stopped to look at a mass of ice and the guide began his spiel. We were all looking around, not having a clue as to what was being said. My one friend, who was a bit dense when it came to jokes, was busy listening. I finally said, "What's he saying?" She said, "He says it's the ice kings organ." There was a pause and then my other friend and I and the two English fellows started laughing. We couldn't stop. And yet the friend who had translated didn't get it. It was at least an hour later as we were walking down the mountain from the cave when she finally realized the joke and THEN she laughed and said, "Haaaaaa! The ice kings organ!"

    I had not known about these caves near Tule Lake. I'll have to put that on my "to visit" list.

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  14. What an interesting place. Thanks for these great photos and information about this, very inspiring to hop on over and check out, someday!

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  15. The Ice Cave indeed seems interesting, even lovely,
    but as you said, too deep down...
    Pictures will do just fine!!
    :)~
    HUGZ

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